demonic wishing eye
demonic wishing eye
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carolrossettidesign:

[image text] Its was a very hot day when Eduarda wore shorts at school. The teacher told her never to dress like that again, because the boys got distracted during class. Eduarda, It’s not your job to make other people behave with decency and respect. You should dress how you feel comfortable!
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nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.
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pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
pagalini:

clo3me:


Too many spoiled people get all of that stuff until they’re 18 😒


if you’re going to call me spoiled when you don’t know anything about my circumstances, then unfollow me and leave me alone. 

i have said this SO MANY TIMES, but this comic is about the little things BECAUSE my life is full of big things. i could have made this comic about the fact that both my parents have serious illnesses or the fact that my family is poor, but i made it about the little things like missing my mum when i do my laundry instead. because i made this comic for ME. 

don’t you call me spoiled. you don’t know anything about me. these are things my parents have done for me, and they are memories i treasure. don’t try to tarnish something i hold dear when you know NOTHING about me. 

because you know what? when i miss my parents and wonder how they are, it’s not in a big weeping mess in a rainstorm. it’s when i put my laundry on and remember how my mum used to be so intense about keeping colours separate. it’s when i watch tv and remember how my dad used to play with my hair. it’s when i cook dinner and remember that my dad was the one who taught me how. this isn’t a comic whining about having to do it myself. it’s a comic about how doing these things remind me of how my life has changed. and the fact that my parents did these things for me in the first place doesn’t mean i’m spoiled. just because our circumstances are different, it doesn’t make me a bad person. don’t be so judgemental. 

i’ve even had people comment on this post in the past saying ‘bitch can’t be too bad she has a macbook’, like that has any standing on my situation??? when i say i’m poor i’m not kidding, i bought my laptop with the bursary i got from my university FOR being poor. because, yknow, when you’re poor and you have the chance to get something nice for yourself, you fucking grab that chance with both hands. 

i’m sick of judgemental people like you making comments before even bothering to think about what my life might actually be like. i’m sick of people like you saying that it’s wrong for my parents to do things like these for me. i’m sick of all of you because you’re thoughtless and you purposefully try to degrade something i hold dear. it’s not difficult to keep your thoughts to yourself, especially when they’re poison. 

if you’d like to swap for a life centred around terminal illnesses and poverty, sure. come on. because you know what? i’ve had a rough time of it and i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to taint what happiness i’ve had. i will tear to pieces anyone who tries to harm anyone’s happiness. because it’s wrong.
+
+
herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES
+
+
heichou-relatable:

#WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH THAT AVACADO
heichou-relatable:

#WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH THAT AVACADO
+
+
+
alternative-pokemon-art:

terezi:

angelickaiser:

cisthulhu:

bittersiha:

kayboss:
the-indoor-kite:

ir-dr:



So what if that’s what’s happened when you find random Pokeballs lying in the grass. They only have the item that the Pokemon was last holding inside them.

; ; !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




YOU FOUND A LUNAR FEATHER!

NO
GO SIT IN THE CORNER AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU DID!

omfg this is quite possibly the saddest fucking thing ever i just can’t i don’t even believe it

OMG
alternative-pokemon-art:

terezi:

angelickaiser:

cisthulhu:

bittersiha:

kayboss:
the-indoor-kite:

ir-dr:



So what if that’s what’s happened when you find random Pokeballs lying in the grass. They only have the item that the Pokemon was last holding inside them.

; ; !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!




YOU FOUND A LUNAR FEATHER!

NO
GO SIT IN THE CORNER AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU DID!

omfg this is quite possibly the saddest fucking thing ever i just can’t i don’t even believe it

OMG